Molecular Biology

Nowadays, the sky is the limit when it comes to the number of ways we can investigate our favorite organism or cell type. 'Omics' approaches such as genomics, transcriptomics, epigenomics, metagenomics, and metatranscriptomics have the power to generate massive amounts of valuable information that can help us to better understand biological...

With the falling cost of NGS services (1) and a wide array of NGS kits and instruments to choose from nowadays, it may seem as though NGS data has never been easier to access. However, as with most other research workflows, obtaining high quality data is never going to be more than a pipe dream without high quality starting material!...

Since its invention in the 1980's, PCR has become a cornerstone technique in molecular biology, with research applications ranging from cloning to gene expression analysis, and clinical applications including genotyping and infectious disease diagnosis.

16S rRNA sequencing has become the standard technique for microbial community composition profiling. Compared to shotgun metagenomics sequencing, 16S rRNA sequencing is more cost-effective and robust, generally requires less input DNA and is less impacted by the presence of host DNA.

The average size kit for molecular biology may contain anything from 50 to several hundred preps. While the possibility to purchase large kits is highly attractive to those with well- established routines, for example, routine plasmid prep, genomic DNA isolation, DNA cleanup etc., the lack of smaller kits is often a drawback to those who only have...

Bioburden is defined as the number of microorganisms living on any surface that has not been sterilized. This surface could be a nucleic acid purification column, a pipette tip, a medical device, or any other surface. To determine bioburden on a given product type, bioburden testing (also known as microbial limit testing) is performed by counting...

Welcome to part 2 of our real-time PCR series. In part 1, we went through the basics of real-time PCR, its advantages over end-point PCR, a typical workflow, data output, and the choice of fluorescent labeling systems available.

In case the name doesn't give it away, real-time PCR is a PCR application that monitors DNA amplification in real time. This means that amplification is monitored during the PCR reaction, and not at the end of the reaction as with end-point PCR, where PCR products are typically analyzed post-run on agarose gels.

Since its dawn in the 1980s, PCR has become a mainstay in most clinical and biological research laboratories. While Real-Time PCR is invaluable in gene expression analysis and determination of gene copy number, end-point PCR remains the method of choice for many screening applications, such as genotyping, paternity testing, pathogen screening, and...